Move-Mailbox cmdlet in Exchange 2007 has been replaced with ‘Move Requests’ in Exchange 2010. Advantages of Move Requests include:

  • Mailboxes are kept online during the asynchronous moves. Yes, end users can still access their e-mail accounts during the move. The user is only locked out of the account for a brief time at the end of the process.
  • For the first time, items in a mailbox’s Recoverable Items folder (dumpster) are moved with the mailbox.
  • The mailbox’s move history is maintained in the mailbox. Yay!
  • Mailbox moves can be managed from any Exchange 2010 server within the organization.
  • As soon as the mailbox begins to move, content indexing starts to scan the mailbox so that fast searching is available upon completion of the move.
  • If a personal archive exists for a mailbox you want to move, the archive gets moved with the primary mailbox. This is because the archive mailbox and the primary mailbox must reside on the same mailbox database. If you’re moving mailboxes from an Exchange 2010 server to an Exchange 2003 or Exchange 2007 server, you need to disable the personal archive before you can move the mailbox.
  • Mailbox content doesn’t move through an administrative machine. For example, in Exchange 2007, when you ran the Move-Mailbox cmdlet, the data move was managed by the computer on which you ran the cmdlet. You couldn’t shut down that session of Exchange until the move completed.
  • Mailbox moves are carried out by the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Replication service (MRS), a new service that runs on all Client Access servers in your Exchange 2010 organization.
  • You can configure throttling for each MRS instance, each mailbox database, or each Mailbox server.
  • Move requests can handle transient errors. MRS conducts checkpoints every 5 minutes to make sure that the database to which the mailbox being moved is still operational. If MRS finds that the target database isn’t operational, MRS will pause for 30 seconds and then retry the move. If you experience a failover, the move won’t fail. Instead, MRS will detect a database failover, determine the new location of the database, and then restart the move process.

Supported Scenarios for Moving Mailboxes:

Moving from Moving to Supported? Online move supported?
Exchange 2010 Exchange 2010 Yes Yes
Exchange 2007 SP2 Exchange 2010 Yes Yes
Exchange 2007 SP1 Exchange 2010 No No
Exchange 2003 SP2 Exchange 2010 Yes No
Exchange 2010 Exchange 2007 SP2 Yes No
Exchange 2010 Exchange 2003 SP2 Yes No
Exchange 2000 Exchange 2010 No No
Exchange 2010 Exchange 2000 No No

More information about Move Requests can be found here.

– Thanks, Jinesh.

 

Move-Mailbox cmdlet in Exchange 2007 has been replaced with ‘Move Requests’ in Exchange 2010. Advantages of move requests include:

 

  • Mailboxes are kept online during the asynchronous moves. Yes, end users can still access their e-mail accounts during the move. The user is only locked out of the account for a brief time at the end of the process.
  • For the first time, items in a mailbox’s Recoverable Items folder (dumpster) are moved with the mailbox.
  • The mailbox’s move history is maintained in the mailbox. Yay!
  • Mailbox moves can be managed from any Exchange 2010 server within the organization.
  • As soon as the mailbox begins to move, content indexing starts to scan the mailbox so that fast searching is available upon completion of the move.
  • If a personal archive exists for a mailbox you want to move, the archive gets moved with the primary mailbox. This is because the archive mailbox and the primary mailbox must reside on the same mailbox database. If you’re moving mailboxes from an Exchange 2010 server to an Exchange 2003 or Exchange 2007 server, you need to disable the personal archive before you can move the mailbox.
  • Mailbox content doesn’t move through an administrative machine. For example, in Exchange 2007, when you ran the Move-Mailbox cmdlet, the data move was managed by the computer on which you ran the cmdlet. You couldn’t shut down that session of Exchange until the move completed.
  • Mailbox moves are asynchronous and are carried out by the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Replication service (MRS), a new service that runs on all Client Access servers in your Exchange 2010 organization.
  • You can configure throttling for each MRS instance, each mailbox database, or each Mailbox server.
  • Move requests can handle transient errors. MRS conducts checkpoints every 5 minutes to make sure that the database to which the mailbox being moved is still operational. If MRS finds that the target database isn’t operational, MRS will pause for 30 seconds and then retry the move. If you experience a failover, the move won’t fail. Instead, MRS will detect a database failover, determine the new location of the database, and then restart the move process.

 

Supported Scenarios for Moving Mailboxes

Moving from

Moving to

Supported?

Online move supported?

Exchange 2010

Exchange 2010

Yes

Yes

Exchange 2007 SP2

Exchange 2010

Yes

Yes

Exchange 2007 SP1

Exchange 2010

No

No

Exchange 2003 SP2

Exchange 2010

Yes

No

Exchange 2010

Exchange 2007 SP2

Yes

No

Exchange 2010

Exchange 2003 SP2

Yes

No

Exchange 2000

Exchange 2010

No

No

Exchange 2010

Exchange 2000

No

No

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd298174.aspx

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