Email Security & Usage Around the World (Infographic)

Email Security & Usage Around the World (Infographic)

This infographic is courtesy of ‘Sample Emails‘ and Designed by ‘Graphs

Advertisements

2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 19,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 4 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

PowerShell Script to Generate a Health Check Report for Exchange Server 2010.

Image

Paul Cunningham has created a script to generate a dashboard style report of your Exchange environment. You need Powershell Version 2.0 or higher (server that has Exchange 2010 roles or management tools installed) to run the script.

You can find the script here.

– Thanks, Jinesh.

//

Create beautiful reports of your Exchange environment using Powershell

Steve Goodman of stevieg.org has created a script that would give you a visual overview of your Exchange environment. The script generates a report that gives you an overview of your environment, Exchange 2003, 2007, 2010 servers and database availability groups – in particular:

  • Total Servers per Exchange version & service pack
  • Total Mailboxes per Exchange version & service pack
  • Totals for Exchange roles across the environment
  • A site-by-site breakdown for the following:
    • Mailboxes per site
    • Exchange servers, version, update rollup  and version, service level, highlighted installed roles, OS version and service pack
  • A breakdown of each Database Availability Group including:
    • DAG name, member count and member list
    • Database information such as
      • Name
      • Mailboxes per database and Average Size
      • Archive mailboxes per database and Average Size only shown if a DB includes Archive mailboxes
      • Database and whitespace size
      • Database and log disk free space percentage
      • Last full backup date/time (new) – only shown if at least one DAG DB has had a full backup
      • Circular Logging state (new) only shown if at least one DAG DB has circular logging enabled
      • Server hosting the active copy
      • List of servers hosting copies and copy count
  • A breakdown of Non-DAG databases including Exchange 2007 and 2003 DBs, including the database information above, along with Storage Group name (where applicable).

The script doesn’t support detailed information about Exchange 2007/2003 CCR/SCC clusters, but these are shown as ClusMBX in the output. At the moment, the script doesn’t show Public Folder information.

Head over to his site for downloading the script and for usage instructions.

– Thanks, Jinesh.

//

2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Syndey Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 10,000 times in 2011. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

//

Exchange 2010 Powershell Cheat Sheet

Matt Abraham has created a “Cheat Sheet” with a list of some of the most important Exchange 2010 PowerShell Cmdlets. A lot of these can be used with Exchange 2007 as well!

The post on OpsVault has the download link.

 

– Thanks, Jinesh.

//

Checking for the existence of a string in a file using Powershell

Using the Select-String Cmdlet, you can determine whether or not a specific string value exists in a text file. PowerShell will return each line in the text file that includes the target string. You can add the -quiet parameter to get back a True if the string is found and nothing if the string is not found. Another Select-String parameter that you might find useful is -casesensitive, which performs a case-sensitive search.

Following is a crude script I wrote to find the existence of three strings in Edgetransport.exe.config file on multiple Hub transport servers. It basically searches for the string in the file, compares it with a standard value and returns a ‘Match’ or ‘No match’ according to what it found.

$CheckServers = Get-Content Servers.txt
foreach( $CSrv in $CheckServers )
    {
    Write-host $Csrv -fore cyan
    $config = get-content “\\$CSrv\D$\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\Bin\Edgetransport.exe.config”
    $Ver1 = $config | Select-String “EnableResourceMonitoring”
    $Ver2 = ‘    <add key=”EnableResourceMonitoring” value=”True” />’
    if ($ver1 -like $ver2)
        {write-host Match -fore green}
    Else
        {write-host No Match -fore red}
    $Wer1 = $config | Select-String “DatabaseCheckPointDepthMax”
    $Wer2 = ‘    <add key=”DatabaseCheckPointDepthMax” value=”536870912″ />’
    if ($Wer1 -like $Wer2)
        {write-host Match -fore green}
    Else
        {write-host No Match -fore red}
    $Xer1 = $config | Select-String “DatabaseMaxCacheSize”
    $Xer2 = ‘    <add key=”DatabaseMaxCacheSize” value=”1073741824″ />’
    if ($Xer1 -like $Xer2)
        {write-host Match -fore green}
    Else
        {write-host No Match -fore red}
    Write-host
    write-host “Press any key to check next server”
    write-host “”
    $x = $host.UI.RawUI.ReadKey(“NoEcho,IncludeKeyDown,AllowCtrlC”)
    }

To run the script, create a file called Servers.txt, populate it with server names, save the code given above to a .ps1 file and run the .ps1 file.

– Thanks, Jinesh.